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Open source curriculum at Idea Fab Labs

11-Aug-15

Recently I’ve begun volunteering at Idea Fab Labs here in Santa Cruz, with two specific goals — expanding the space to include free/open source software ethos and hacking, and helping all these awesome makers with questions and reality around the open source way.

Tip — I got quite fired-up to do this from Ruth Suehle’s keynote at SCALE this year, so go watch that if you need any reason why you should be helping maker spaces and friends with your open sourcery.

On the first goal, I’m working up a space in the fab labs — similar to the 3D printing, CNC router, laser cutter, jewelry zone, electronics, etc. spaces — goal is to have a place to drop in and do real software hacking; teach others from the bottom all the way up on how and why to contribute; or, yeah, even freaking care about open source software.

Tip — if you live in the 21st century and care about the progress of technology, you should freaking care.

One of my many strategic plans is to launch a curriculum that we deliver 1x to 2x a month (year one), growing toward 2x to 4x a month (i.e., every week maybe!)

What do you think of these topic ideas as a way to introduce free/open source software to a local community that is technical, maker-oriented, but full of questions?

  • “What is open source?” — Basic explanation of what free/open source software is for all audiences.
  • “How do I fix this open source thing?” — You are using free/open source software in some way and have discovered something you wish to fix, report, or comment on, but … how do you do that? 1 hour class covers basics in 15 minutes, then dives in to two or three specific projects as examples.
  • “What are open source alternatives to My Favorite Software?” — You have some reason you MUST use N software from M vendor, but maybe something else will work as well?
  • “How do I use X open source software to accomplish Y?” — You want to learn how a specific tool such as GIMP, Inkscape, Blender, Krita, LibreOffice (OpenOffice), etc., might work for your need.
  • “Open source and your business – practical answers to practical questions” — You are wondering how people make money on this ‘free’ stuff. AKA, no-cost does not mean no-money.
  • “Avoiding open washing — following the open source way beyond software” — Open movements are everywhere, but are they all equal and give the same essential freedoms as free/open source software?
  • “How do I start an open source-like contribution community?” — You are ready to start a project of some kind, such as software but maybe maker-CAD-files or farm equipment or whatever. Practical step-by-step guide to be successful.

Thanks for your thoughts, my local peeps in Santa Cruz will really benefit. :) Of course, all materials I write will be released under a Creative Commons license as part of The Open Source Way.

Update on CentOS GSoC 2015

02-Jun-15

Here’s an update on the CentOS Project Google Summer of Code for 2015 posted on the CentOS Seven blog:

http://seven.centos.org/2015/06/centos-and-gsoc-2015-suddenly-come-seven-on-7/

This might be of interest to the Fedora Project community, so I’m pushing my own reference here to appear on the Fedora Planet. Much of the work happening in the CentOS GSoC effort may be useful as-is or as elements within Fedora work. (In at least one case, the RootFS build factory for Arm, the work is also happening partially in Fedora, so it’s a triple-win.)

Kimchi recipe

24-May-15

After making kimchi (or kimchee if you prefer) as a group with our Fairytale Farm interns, I got asked by one of them for the recipe. As is my standard mode, I want to release my recipes as free content, so I’m writing it up here first, then will link it out to All The Places. (I have to recommend working with a group or at least one other person, when you can — we did more massaging of the ingredients than I usually do, and it gave out almost enough liquid that I only had to add one-plus cup of water to each gallon.)

You may want to read more about sauerkraut and lactic-acid fermentation, as well as about kimchi itself. It’s really fascinating. One tip I have is that I choose not to “backsplash”, which is the term I’ve heard for the practice of pouring some of the liquid from an existing fermentation in to the new fermentation. Some people do this by using the fermented whey they get from hanging yogurt. I’ve found that I don’t like the texture and flavor when the fermentation is cut short in that way. In lactic-acid fermentation, there are several stages of fermentation that can only occur when you work up from just raw vegetables and salt. Backsplashing results in jumping ahead to the later fermentation stages. However, I often to backslpash after the fermentation is complete, so as to carry on the microbiotic benefits of the previous generation.

In this recipe I’m going to specify things by a single unit — one head of cabbage, one carrot, etc. My usual recipe would be about a 4x to 6x of the below, which would make about 1.5 or 2 gallons. The challenge is that a cabbage head or an onion is not a consistent size, so you have to gird your loins a bit and make some guesstimates in the end. That is, it’s not a cake recipe measured by weight at sea level in the south of France.

  • One tablespoon of salt.
    • I use Himalayan pink salt because
  • One medium to large head of napa cabbage
  • One medium carrot [per head of cabbage]
  • One-half to a whole a medium yellow onion (you may use more onion) [per head of cabbage]
  • One chunk of ginger the size of two cloves of garlic [per head of cabbage]
  • Two cloves of garlic [per head of cabbage]
  • One chunk of fresh turmeric the size of one clove of garlic [per head of cabbage]
  • Ground sweet to hot peppers of various types (paprika, mild chili, chipotle, and cayenne/african bird pepper/etc.) — adjust amount to taste but don’t put too much overpowering hot peppers in, unless you like that sort of thing
    • Per head of cabbage try a mix such as this:
      • 1 teaspoon sweet paprika
      • 1/2 teaspoon chipotle
      • 1/2 teaspoon mild chili
      • 1/8 teaspoon cayenne or hotter
  • Fresh ground black pepper (just keep grinding, but if you want an amount, at least 1/8 teaspoon per head of cabbage)
  • One teaspoon fish sauce or soy sauce (wheat free tamari is what I use) or neither
    • I usually make mine without fish or soy sauce so that it appeals to the widest diets, but for my own personal kimchi I put in lots of fish sauce.
    • Tip: wait to put these ingredients in until after the main lactic-acid fermentation is pretty complete, as fish and soy sauce are both fermentations and may change the fermentation process.

Start by cutting napa cabbage into squares roughly 1/2″ x 1/2″ (1cm x 1cm), larger for the greener parts is fine. Put in large stainless steel or glass bowl. Throw in salt, mix and mash and squeeze and mix to get the salt to integrate with the cabbage and start pulling water from the cabbage. Let sit while you work the rest of the ingredients.

Smash the ginger with the side of a knife to pound the fibers flat, then coarsely chop and put in a food processor. Do the same with the garlic and turmeric. There is no need to peel the ginger or turmeric (but definitely peel the garlic.) Pulse in the food processor until finely chopped. (You can do all this by hand if you prefer … sore hands.) Dump contents in to the bowl of cabbage, scraping the food processor with a rubber/silicone spatula.

Grate carrot on largest setting. I actually prefer a fine matchstick size from a vegetable mandoline, but you may use a cheese grater as long as you get the size up to pretty big. If your carrot is shredded fine it will dissolve too easily, become mushy quickly, and never be a nice crunchy pickle texture.

Cut both ends off the onion and peel, then slice in half from one end to the other. This leaves the fibers mainly intact so the juices remain in each sliver. Set the onion cut-side down, then cut half moon slivers working over the arc of the onion. (This WikiHow onion cutting techniques article has a good example as method one “Slice”.) Put the slices in the bowl with the cabbage. Don’t worry if you cut the wrong way or too large, it will work fine just be crunchier or softer in the end depending.

Toss in the chili powder mix.

Mix and smash and squeeze and pound and mix and mix. Mix some more. The more work you do here, the faster it will give out liquid, which helps you get a more compact (less dilute) brine.

You can let this sit in the bowl from 1 to 24 hours. When you are ready to set things up for proper fermentation, stuff the ingredients in to one or more quart-size wide mouth canning jar(s). Push contents down tightly, trying to cover with the liquid. If there is not enough liquid, which is common, add filtered (non-chlorinated) water to just cover the vegetables. (Chlorine in the water will kill some of the bacteria and other microbes you want to be present for flavor and pickling.)

Sit the jar on the counter in your kitchen, it doesn’t need to be in the dark. You can leave it uncovered (which may introduce other microbiotics that can improve or change the flavor or texture. Experiment with loosely covering if you want to see the difference.) If you have very active fermentation it might bubble over, so you can put a plate or tray underneath the jar(s). Taste and chew a piece of cabbage each day so you can experience the transformation. Use a the flat-side of a fork or spoon to push the vegetables back in to the liquid once or twice a day — you want the vegetables to pickle rather than ‘rot’ in the air (i.e. be broken down by enzymatic action instead of lactic fermentation.)

It should be ready to put in the fridge between day 4 and day 7, depending on your weather conditions. I’ve never found that I need to “bury it in the ground for six months”, but I can see how letting it ferment more slowly (such as in a cool basement/cellar) would help it keep longer without refrigeration.

Try variations of adding in about 20% other leafy green, such as kale or my favorite, Chinese mustard greens.

SCALE 13x – no talking, all walking, and a great ally skills workshop

10-Mar-15

For the first time in-I-can’t-remember I didn’t submit a talk to SCALE, so it was with a different personal energy that I attended SCALE 13x on 19 to 22 February this year. Not having a do-or-die public-speaking-scheduled-thing in front of me allowed for a more relaxed state of mind. Yet it was strange to not be one of the speakers this time. Still, all my old SCALE friends made me feel very welcome and accommodated. As usual, it was nice to have my family there, where so many know them as former speakers and regular attendees.

Rather than focus on talking to an audience, this time I spent my energy walking around the expo hall-and-wherever to talk with as many projects and companies as possible. My goal was to get an idea of who uses CentOS Linux, for what purposes, and get ideas of what people need and want from the project. I also provided information on what the Project has been up to especially around SIGs. That activity was fun, informative, and interesting.

Also I spent my share of time at the booth that housed the CentOS Project, RDO/OpenStack, oVirt, and OpenShift Origin. (I can’t wait to see the next iterations of Ryan’s Raspberry Pi 2 mini-cluster demo for OpenShift Origin.) I watched other people, including my wife, play with instruments and music software at the ever-popular Fedora Project booth (winners once again of a favorite booth award.) With a small rock concert and 3D printer, it was hard not to notice.

There were two sessions I was drawn to the most. The first was Ruth Suehle‘s keynote on Sunday morning, Makers:  The Next Frontier for Open Source. I’ve worked with Ruth a long time, seen her speak multiple times, seen lots of cool stuff that she’s made over the years, and I knew it would be an excellent talk. She used her great bully pulpit to teach and entreat the audience about the needs of the makers communities to get some serious clue and help from open source communities.

The other session was a workshop on Friday to learn skills as a man to be an ally for women when sexist things happen. This is something I’m interested in, being a better ally for people, including in the face of sexism and sexist behavior. For myself, I’ve begun calling myself a born again feminist. To me that means I’ve had a later-in-life realization that while I’ve always supported the ideas and topics around feminism, I wasn’t really aware how deeply pervasive sexism is, how blandly I’d looked past it, and that I could be part of the solution. Part of being part of the solution is not being afraid of being a feminist in name and action.

The workshop (described in detail here) was lead by Valerie Aurora, who’s gone from kernel hacker to executive director of the Ada Initiative. The Ada Initiative “supports women in open technology and culture …” Thus the workshop was primarily for people working in open technology and open culture. It started with a brief introduction that was useful in many ways, such as reminding us about how to best engage with difficult online exchanges (more advanced than ‘don’t feed the trolls’), the reason for needing male allies (hint:  it’s about doing something good with the privileged position and power that one has in society), and keeping it all in a useful context by not having the workshop be a place to debate “is there sexism?” Instead we acknowledge there is something broken, it needs fixing, and we here can do something about it. You can watch an introduction and highlights of the workshop in this video that Valerie gave to the staff at the Wikimedia Foundation, with closed captioned subtitles available for English.

For the majority of the workshop, we were in small groups (4 to 6 people) to discuss approaches we would take to certain scenarios. One scenario (as I recall them) was, “A woman is standing outside of your group at an event and looks as if she might be interested in joining the discussion. How would you handle this?” Another was, “At a work party someone comments that a co-worker with a large number of children must get a lot of sex.” Then the small groups discussed our approaches, and presented some ideas or questions back to the overall group. And then on to the next scenario.

The discussion/collaboration session was really useful in a number of ways. First, it helped give specific and general ideas of how to handle — and not handle — specific scenarios. Second, it also served to give a crosscut of different types of situations that do occur, so you can take skills from one scenario more easily in to another. Not only was it useful for dealing with sexist situations, it was easy to see the same thinking and skills could be applied to any situation where someone is objectified, made to be an Other, treated as a stereotype, and so forth — thus useful for handling racism, ageism, and so forth. Third, it was useful to get a chance to practice what to say in response when we witness sexism, partially because it’s helps us to have something to immediately say rather than being shocked and mute.

The format of the workshop was great. Elements included working in small groups, a person in each group being a gatekeeper who makes sure everyone in the group is heard from, presenting ideas back to the overall group in a discussion format, all the way down to how we introduced ourselves to our small groups. I also appreciated moving across groups at least once, that helped us get fresher perspectives with each scenario.

This is definitely a workshop I’d like to bring to any tech company. All of us can use help and perspective on how to react when someone does something sexist, or we have a chance to do something about systemic sexism. We can agree that it’s unkind to make people feel uncomfortable, and it’s kind to help people by pushing against the discomfort making.

There is something I’ve noticed for most of my life. When talking with my peers — people who are born mainly after the 1960s in a post-feminist-creation era — we are often in agreement about how people should treat each other along the axes of sex, race, gender, and so forth. And while I see in younger generations a huge amount of support for ideas such as “people should be able to legally marry whomever they want”, I still hear a lot of people afraid of the f-word — feminism. It’s as if people are in full agreement with the concepts behind the word, but afraid to use the word itself. This is the other part of my ‘born again’ experience, that I need to embrace the word as well as the concept in order to really align myself correctly, live correctly, and be a good ally of all people.

And now a few words from Paul C.

26-Nov-14

Although some people in open source communities might not be aware of him, Paul Cormier holds a singular position in the open source world. This hinges on the detail that Red Hat is the longest standing and most successful company at promoting the growth of free/open source software and especially the acceptance of that software in the enterprise (large businesses.) Paul is a Red Hat EVP, but he is also the President of Products and Technologies, meaning he is ultimately accountable for what Red Hat does in creating products the open source way. Paul has held this position essentially for the last dozen years, and so has overseen everything in Red Hat from the creation of Fedora Linux to the rise of cloud computing that Red Hat is an intimate part of.

In other words, when Paul C. speaks — keynote or in-person — he is someone really worth paying close attention to.

In this post on Red Hat’s open source community website, “One Year Later:  Paul Cormier on Red Hat and the CentOS Project“, I provide some introduction and background around a video interview Paul did with ServerWatch about the Red Hat and CentOS Project relationship.

(Speaking of ‘intimately’, that explains my relationship to Red Hat and the CentOS Project — I spent all of 2013 architecting and delivering on making CentOS Linux the third leg in the stool of Red Hat platform technologies. When I say in the “One Year Later…” article about “making sure (Paul C. is) happy and excited about Red Hat joining forces with the CentOS Project,” that responsibility is largely mine.)

CentOS Dojo in Orlando at Fossetcon 11 Sep

05-Sep-14

If you are in Florida or in Orlando attending Fossetcon next week, come over to our next CentOS Dojo on Thursday 11 September (all day).

CentOS Dojos are a one day event that bring together people from the CentOS communities to talk about systems administration, best practises, and emerging technologies.”

At this particular Dojo we have this great lineup of information, discussion, and getting things done:

  • Jim Perrin (@BitIntegrity) will start the day with a few minutes about the CentOS Project and do some introductions around the room.
  • Garrett Honeycutt (@learnpuppet) goes next with a session, “Why Automation is Important” that covers topics such as configuration management with Puppet, Ansible, et al.
  • Dmitri Pal from the FreeIPA project will discuss “Active Directory Integration”, a popular topic for many sysadmins and ops people stuck with a mixed-in-with-Windows environment.
  • Greg Sheremeta (@gregsheremeta) of the oVirt project finishes with a tutorial on using the oVirt all-in-one installer. oVirt is virtualization management around KVM (cf. VMWare vSphere) with a growing userbase.
  • Then a sponsored lunch and time to network with your fellow Dojo attendees.
  • After lunch until the evening is a hackfest focusing on building and using Docker, building Xen components for CentOS 6, and whatever else gets cooked up. The CentOS team will be bringing a local mirror and WiFi for connecting on a private LAN for the hackfest. You can bring your laptop, ideas, and skills.

If you are interested in attending, please sign up on our event page.

Rate of discussion analysis on centos-devel

09-Jun-14

I was curious how the discussion rate on centos-devel compared to previous time periods. I want to know if our work on growing the project participation at the contributor level is working, and while examples such as the increase in the SIG activity are a good indication, one simple one is to see if there is more discussion in the contributor communication channels. Based on what I see, the trend looks very good.

To make this chart, I simply grabbed all the sizes of the mail archives from the centos-devel archive page and dropped them in to a spreadsheet.

Chart showing discussion rate on centos-devel over 10 year period

Discussion level on centos-devel over last decade.

My analysis is pretty simple.

  • There have been other periods of time where the discussion level was this high (above 50 KB in archive size), but they appear more to be spikes than sustained discussion, with the exception of November 2010 through July 2011. If you were around the Project during that time, you know that is a reflection of work and associated noise around the CentOS 6 release. Although the sustained discussion levels are similar, I think the tone of the discussions is quite different, so I weigh the current trend as “good” by comparison because it reflects growing participation rather than concern about the timing of the CentOS 6 release.
  • 50 KB seems like a good level to judge against in that it seems most months reach at least 25 KB, but going above 50 KB is less common. In the nine years the archives track, the size has gone above 50 KB about 20 times out of 112 archived months, or about 18% of the time. (By comparison, the size has gone above 25 KB 64 times, or 57% of the time.)
  • The one largest-spike-of-all-time is January 2014, which is easily attributable to the announcement about joining forces with Red Hat and the subsequent discussions. Again, the tone of those emails was quite good, as compared to the previously largest spike of February 2011. That spike was to be expected since the news caught many people by surprise, so I’m generally ignoring it as an outlying data point in terms of having any more meaning than that.

Why consensus-decision making is better for open source projects

21-Apr-14

Many of us use consensus-style decision making in our free/open source projects such as Apache’s lazy consensus model, but often we have a practice or even a governance of having things end up in a majority-wins voting process.

In a majority-wins voting model, the dynamic is one where the dissenters are marginalized — the majority has to put the dissenting minority in the position of being a “loser” in a vote.

In a consensus-decision model with blocking, you have a situation where it becomes the duty of the entire group to take care of the dissenters’ concerns.

In general, consensus decisions force the group to focus on a compromise around the best-possible solution. When people are in the position of being a winner or a loser, the effect is to make people solidify around one of two extremes that may not represent the best possible solution.

Often achieving consensus only requires clarification of a misunderstanding or minor adjustments to the original proposal. This occurs even where no one has blocked, but the appearance of -0 (or a stand aside) will also make it clear that the original proposal might need more thought — getting a -0 from a leading thinker in a group spurs others to wonder if maybe there is more that can be done to make the proposal fully supported.

There are a lot more details to how things work in practice in a consensus-decision model, which I covered fairly well in the Appendix to the CentOS Project Board governance, quoted here:

In the CentOS Project a discussion toward a decision follows this process:

  1. A proposal is put forth and a check for consensus is made.
    1. Consensus is signified through a +1 vote.
  2. A check is made for any dissent on the proposal.
    1. Reservations? State reservation, sometimes with a ‘-1’ signifier
      1. Reservations about the proposal are worked through, seeking consensus to resolve the reservations.
      2. A reservation is not a vote against the proposal, but may turn into a vote against if unresolved. It is often expressed with an initial -1 vote to indicate reservations and concerns. This indicates there is still discussion to be had.
    2. Stand aside? No comment, or state concerns without a -1 reservation; sometimes the ‘-0’ signifier is used.
      1. This option allows a member to have issues with the proposal without choosing to block the proposal, by instead standing aside with a +/-0 vote.
      2. The stated concerns may influence other people to have or release reservations.
    3. Block? Vote ‘-1’ with reasons for the block.
      1. This is a complete block on a proposal, refusing to let it pass. A block is a -1 vote and must be accompanied with substantive arguments that are rooted in the merit criteria of the Project – protecting the community, the upstream, technical reasons, and so forth.

Block (-1) votes used as a veto are typically used only when consensus cannot otherwise be met, and are effectively a veto that any sitting Board member can utilize with sufficient substantiation.

In writing the original section of The Open Source Way, I didn’t go so far as to recommend the abandonment of the majority-wins voting method, instead I said, “Seek consensus — use voting as a last resort.” That section (unfinished) is now going to get a rewrite where I’ll definitely come down against majority-wins, and write out more of the why.

Partially I owe my improved understanding from using the consensus model in a business collective where I’m a partner, Santa Cruz Pedicab. Working with the model in the physical world made me intensely aware of the human impact of majority-wins by comparison, and convinced me it was really the backbone to a welcoming community.

CentOS Dojo Santa Clara – 31 March before MySQL Conf

19-Mar-14

On the eve of the Percona Live:  MySQL Conference and Expo (Monday 31 March 2014) I get to help run my first CentOS Dojo at the Santa Clara Convention Center. For this event, I’ll MC and give a talk about the newness in the CentOS Project. The lineup so far is pretty set and quite stellar:

  • Jeremy Carroll — Systems Automation and Metrics at Pinterest:  “At Pinterest metrics instrumentation and presentation has been an increasingly vital as our systems scale …”
  • Monty Widenius — Notes on MariaDB 10:  “MariaDB is coming along in great strides, and is now included by default in the EL7 Beta cycle …”
  • Peter Zaitsev — Running MySQL on CentOS Linux:  “Linux is by far the most common platform to run MySQL, and there is a lot of accumulated knowledge about which way is best to run MySQL …”
  • Jordan Sissel — Happy Tools:  “Happy tools! This talk will introduce three different operations-friendly tools to help make you happier …”
  • Joe Miller — Two Years in Your Future:  “Systemd is the new kid on the block, everyone is talking about it, everyone is thinking about it, everyone is planning for it …”
  • Joe Brockmeier — Software Collections on CentOS:  “The power to build, install and use multiple versions of software on the same system, without affecting system-wide installed packages. Welcome to software collections …”
  • Karsten Wade — The New CentOS Project:  “A new Board member’s perspective on where the CentOS project is today and the road ahead …”

Massive thanks to Joe Brockmeier and Karanbir Singh (of the OSAS and OSAS/CentOS Engineering teams) and Kortney Runyan and the event crew at Percona. If you want to attend, hop on it — space is limited. :) It’s a no-cost event and comes with the bonus of a no-cost expo and keynote pass for Percona Live. Oh, did I mention we’ll serve you some lunch and generally treat you right?

If you are attending the main conference, visit us as the CentOS Project booth in the DotOrg Pavilion — or contact me if you are interested in staffing the booth.

SCALE 12x – CentOS and Infrastructure.Next

19-Feb-14

We’re very excited over here to be attending the twelfth annual Southern California Linux Expo, aka SCALE 12x, on 21 to 23 February in likely-to-be-sunny Los Angeles.

On Friday, I’m going to hang out near the stage and nod cleverly as Jim Perrin tells us about “Growing CentOS as a Platform for Infrastructure Development“. You can register for Infrastructure.Next (it’s no-cost!) here. It’s a full day devoted to learning about how real people are solving real problems with open source. I’ll have to visit my friends at the Fedora Activity Day. Then I’ll do the brisk-for-LA dinner so I can get back for Lawrence Lessig’s keynote, “Only You Can Get This, So Where Are You?” at 9 pm.

Saturday is dedicated to all the fun the expo has to offer, plus the evening activities. I’ll be hanging out at the Fedora, CentOS, and Red Hat booths. I’ll definitely carve time for m’man Jason Hibbets’ “Open Source ALL The Cities” – a topic near to my heart, one I’ve acted on, but barely to the extent Jason has, so I’m looking forward to learning more from him (and seeing a friend speak, natch.) Closing Saturday, two other friends-also-faves are Ruth Suehle (“Raspberry Pi Hacks“) and Rikki Endsley (“You know, for kids! 7 tips for improving tech education in our schools“), at 6 pm opposite each other (curse the schedule overlords!!!), I may have to favor Rikki as I had the fortune to catch Ruth in Scotland talking on the same topic a few months ago … which is another story. And look! I have another colleague, Rich Bowen (“Demystifying mod_rewrite“) at the same time (a skill I sorely need to demystify), and I note Dawn Foster is talking as well … So much goodness!

Sunday kicks off for me with Leslie Hawthorn at 10 am with “Why Checking Your Privilege is Good For *You*“. Leslie is another friend-and-great-speaker, but I’ll note that she’s particularly interesting to listen to and I think more so on this topic. I’m very much looking forward to this, especially as the newbie feminist that I am. Then Thomas Cameron is speaking on “Next Generation High Availability Linux Clustering” at 11:30, which I hope to be able to catch some of (and heckle.). I’ll be preparing for the “CentOS Project Q&A Forum” that I’m leading with Jim Perrin and Johnny Hughes at 1:30, where I’m looking forward to some reverse-heckling from Thomas. Perusing the schedule, I found the quite intriguing, “Hacking the Kernel, Hacking Myself” talk by Kelley Nielsen at 4:30. I’ve quite interested to hear her story around the domains of kernel development, personal development, the Outreach Program for Women, and her story overall.